Serena Versus the Drones

My new book, How To, comes out on September 3rd (preorder: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, and Apple Books).

One of the most exciting things about writing How To was that, for a few chapters, I was able to reach out to some extremely cool people who were willing to apply their unique expertise to ridiculous tasks. Among those who generously agreed to help was Serena Williams.

Here’s a portion of the chapter “How to Catch a Drone”, in which Serena helped test whether tennis serves could be an effective countermeasure against flying robots … by taking a drone out onto a court and hitting tennis balls at it until it crashed.


How to Catch a Drone

A wedding-photography drone is buzzing around above you. You don’t know what it’s doing there and you want it to stop.

Let’s suppose you have a garage full of sports equipment— baseballs, tennis rackets, lawn darts, you name it. Which sport’s projectiles would work best for hitting a drone? And who would make the best anti-drone guard? A baseball pitcher? A basketball player? A tennis player? A golfer? Someone else?

There are a few factors to consider — accuracy, weight, range, and projectile size.

One sport I couldn’t find good data on was tennis. I found some studies of tennis pro accuracy, but they involved hitting targets marked on the court, rather than in the air.

So I reached out to Serena Williams.

To my pleasant surprise, she was happy to help out. Her husband, Alexis, offered a sacrificial drone, a DJI Mavic Pro 2 with a broken camera. They headed out to her practice court to see how effective the world’s best tennis player would be at fending off a robot invasion.

The few studies I could find suggested tennis players would score relatively low com- pared to athletes who threw projectiles— more like kickers than pitchers. My tentative guess was that a champion player would have an accuracy ratio around 50 when serving, and take 5–7 tries to hit a drone from 40 feet. (Would a tennis ball even knock down a drone? Maybe it would just ricochet off and cause the drone to wobble! I had so many questions.)

Alexis flew the drone over the net and hovered there, while Serena served from the baseline.

Her first serve went low. The second zipped past the drone to one side.

The third serve scored a direct hit on one of the propellers. The drone spun, momentarily seemed like it might stay in the air, then flipped over and smashed into the court. Serena started laughing as Alexis walked over to investigate the crash site, where the drone lay on the court near several propeller fragments.

I had expected a tennis pro would be able to hit the drone in five to seven tries; she got it in three.


For more on anti-drone strategies, sports projectile accuracy, a discussion with a robot ethicist about whether hitting a drone with a tennis ball is wrong, and many other topics, check out How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems, available September 3rd (preorder: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, and Apple Books).

Win an xkcd sketch

Want a personalized sketch of yourself as an xkcd-style stick figure? If so, you can preorder my new book How To and submit this form to enter a contest to win a personalized sketch of yourself!

Fifteen entrants will be randomly chosen to win a personalized stick figure portrait. I’ll draw a sketch of you and send it to you, so you can share it online, hang it on your wall, use it as your social media avatar, or whatever else you’d like.

There’s more information at the contest page here, and you can find out more about How To and read the introduction to the book here.

How To: Chapter list and introduction

My new book, How Tocomes out next month! You can preorder it on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, and Apple Books.

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I’m really excited about it! Here’s the first preview of what’s inside:

Chapter list

  • How to Jump Really High
  • How to Throw a Pool Party
  • How to Dig a Hole
  • How to Play the Piano
  • How to Make an Emergency Landing
  • How to Cross a River

blog-hole

  • How to Move
  • How to Keep Your House from Moving
  • How to Build a Lava Moat
  • How to Throw Things
  • How to Play Football
  • How to Predict the Weather
  • How to Play Tag
  • How to Ski

  • How to Mail a Package
  • How to Power Your House (on Earth)
  • How to Power Your House (on Mars)
  • How to Make Friends
  • How to Send a File
  • How to Charge Your Phone
  • How to Take a Selfie

blog-river

  • How to Catch a Drone
  • How to Tell If You’re a Nineties Kid
  • How to Win an Election
  • How to Decorate a Tree
  • How to Get Somewhere Fast
  • How to Be On Time
  • How to Dispose of This Book

In addition to the main chapters, the book also features short guides on topics including tornado chasing, dog walking, and highway engineering.

Introduction

This is a book of bad ideas.

At least, most of them are bad ideas. It’s possible some good ones slipped through the cracks. If so, I apologize.

Some ideas that sound ridiculous turn out to be revolutionary. Smearing mold on an infected cut sounds like a terrible idea, but the discovery of penicillin showed that it could be a miracle cure. On the other hand, the world is full of disgusting stuff that you could smear on a wound, and most of them won’t make it better. Not all ridiculous ideas are good. So how do we tell the good ideas from the bad? We can try them and see what happens. But sometimes, we can use math, research, and things we already know to work out what will happen if we do.

When NASA was planning to send its car-size Curiosity rover to Mars, they had to figure out how to land it gently on the surface. Previous rovers had landed using parachutes and air bags, so NASA engineers considered this approach with Curiosity, but the rover was too large and heavy for parachutes to slow it down enough in Mars’s thin atmosphere. They also thought about mounting rockets on the rover to let it hover and touch down gently, but the exhaust would create dust clouds that would obscure the surface and make it hard to land safely.

Eventually, they came up with the idea of a sky crane —a vehicle that would hover high above the surface using rockets while lowering Curiosity to the ground on a long tether. This sounded like a ridiculous idea, but every other idea they could come up with was worse. The more they looked at the sky crane idea, the more plausible it seemed. So they tried it, and it worked.

We all start out life not knowing how to do things. If we’re lucky, when we need to do something, we can find someone to show us how. But sometimes, we have to come up with a way to do it ourselves. This means thinking of ideas and then trying to decide whether they’re good or not.

This book explores unusual approaches to common tasks, and looks at what would happen to you if you tried them. Figuring out why they would or wouldn’t work can be fun and informative and sometimes lead you to surprising places. Maybe an idea is bad, but figuring out exactly why it’s a bad idea can teach you a lot—and might help you think of a better approach.

And even if you already know the right way to do all these things, it can be helpful to try to look at the world through the eyes of someone who doesn’t. After all, for anything that everyone knowsby the time they reach adulthood, every day over 10,000 people in the United States alone are learning it for the first time.

ten_thousand

That’s why I don’t like making fun of people for admitting they don’t know something or never learned how to do something. Because if you do that, all it does is teach them not to tell you when they’re learning something . . . and you miss out on the fun.

This book may not teach you how to throw a ball, how to ski, or how to move. But I hope you learn something from it. If you do, you’re one of today’s lucky 10,000.

Preorder: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, IndieBound, and Apple Books.

San Diego Comic-Con

I’m going to be at Comic-Con in San Diego this week! I’ll be appearing on panels with some really neat people for conversations about science, comics, and writing, and talking about my new book, How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems.

Here’s my panel/event schedule. If you’re attending, come see me there!

THURSDAY JULY 18, 2019

6:30 – 7:30 PM
CONDENSING AN IDEA: MAKING THE DIFFICULT PALATABLE
Location: Room 26AB
How do you distill a story down to its main components? Comics often call for brevity, but how does that work with a complex story or idea? Comic-Con special guests discuss how they delve into their complex worlds of comics and come out the other side with stories we readily consume. Panelists include Kurt Busiek (Avengers), Jon B. Cooke (Comic Book Artist), and Randall Munroe (xkcd), along with Dani Colman, Tea Fougner (editorial director for comics, King Features Syndicate), and moderator Barbara Dillon.
More info: https://sched.co/Rlvs

FRIDAY JULY 19, 2019

10:00 – 11:00 AM
THE FACTUAL AND THE ACTUAL
Location: Room 32AB
Enjoy exploring science, history, space, and more through sequential art with Randall Munroe (How to), John Hendrix (The Faithful Spy), Don Brown (Rocket to the Moon! Big Ideas That Changed the World #1), Dylan Meconis (Queen of the Sea), Jim Ottaviani(Hawking), and Rachel Ignotofsky (Women in Art) in conversation with librarian Judy Prince-Neeb (Chula Vista Public Library).
More info: https://sched.co/RqBO

SATURDAY JULY 20, 2019

10:00 – 11:00 AM
SPOTLIGHT ON RANDALL MUNROE- How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common, Real-World Problems
Location: Room 4
Randall Munroe, creator of xkcd, discusses his new book How To, a guide to using science to turn everyday problems into much bigger, more exciting problems. Learn how to cross a river by boiling it, get tips on how to make skiing much more dangerous using liquid oxygen, and hear about his experience asking famous experts the most ridiculous questions he could think of.
More info: https://sched.co/Rra2

3:00PM
ADVANCED GALLEY SIGNING
Location: Random House Booth #1515
Come by the Penguin Random House booth to get a signed advanced copy of Randall Munroe’s forthcoming book “HOW TO: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems.” Tickets are required for all signings at the Penguin Random House book and are available first come, first serve and while supplies last. Tickets will be distributed approximately 10 minutes before the start time.  

SUNDAY JULY 21, 2019

1:00 – 2:00 PM
SHORT FORM COMICS FOR EVERY READER
Location: Room # 28DE
Aminder Dhaliwal (Woman World), Ebony Flowers (Hot Comb), Kevin Huizenga (The River at Night), Randall Munroe (What If), and Sophie Yanow (The Contradictions) are masters of the short form comic, whether serialized online, in pamphlets, or collected in graphic novel form. Sarah Mirk, senior editor at The Nib, leads a conversation on pacing, flow from story to story (or strip to strip), and much more.
More info: https://sched.co/Rsrz

Book tour announcement!

My new book, How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems, is coming out on September 3rd, and I’ll be going on a short book tour! (Full information for each stop is included at the bottom of this post.)

HowToTour-image-FINAL

How to invite me to your town

Don’t see your city on the list? You can invite me! I’ll be adding one more US stop to my tour based on the results of a challenge.

The challenge: Write the best story using nothing but book covers.

Arrange the titles of your favorite books into sentences that tell a story, assemble a single continuous line of people holding up the covers, and take a photo or video documenting your feat. You can make the story as long as you want, but each book needs to be held by a different human.

Example 2

Creative grammar is fine, and you’ll get extra credit for including as many books and people as possible.

Example 1

Once your photo or video entry is ready, share it in one of two ways:

Submit your entry between June 10 and July 31. Make sure to include your location (city/state, US only) so we know where to find you! The winner will be announced in August.

Questions? Email howtoxkcd@gmail.com with QUESTION in the subject line!

Full tour information

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3
CAMBRIDGE, MA
7:00 PM | HARVARD SCIENCE CENTER presented by HARVARD BOOKSTORE
Sanders Theater, 45 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138
Tickets and information

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 4
WASHINGTON, DC
7:00 PM | SIDWELL FRIENDS SCHOOL presented by POLITICS & PROSE
Meeting House, 3825 Wisconsin Ave, Washington, DC 20016
Tickets and information

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 5
NEW YORK, NY
7:00 PM | COOPER UNION presented by STRAND BOOK STORE
E 7th St, New York, NY 10003
Tickets and information

FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 6
ANN ARBOR, MI
7:00 PM | RACKHAM AUDITORIUM presented by LITERATI BOOKSTORE
915 E Washington St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Tickets and information

SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 8
PORTLAND, OR
7:30 PM | POWELL’S CITY OF BOOKS
1005 W Burnside St, Portland, OR 97209
Event information coming soon! Click here to pre-order the book with Powell’s.

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 9
SEATTLE, WA
7:00 PM | THIRD PLACE BOOKS
17171 Bothell Way NE, #A101, Lake Forest Park, WA 98155
Tickets and information

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 10
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
7:30 PM | FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF BERKELEY presented by KPFA and PEGASUS BOOKS
2345 Channing Way, Berkeley, CA 94704
Tickets and information

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 11
SANTA CRUZ, CA
7:00 PM | SANTA CRUZ BIBLE CHURCH presented by BOOKSHOP SANTA CRUZ
440 Frederick St, Santa Cruz, CA 95062
Tickets and information

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 12
LOS ANGELES, CA
8:00 PM | ARATANI THEATER presented by LIVE TALKS LA
244 S. San Pedro Street, Downtown Los Angeles, CA 90012
Tickets and information

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 14
SALT LAKE CITY, UT
7:00 PM | LIBBY GARDNER HALL @ UNIVERSITY OF UTAH presented by WELLER BOOK WORKS & UTAH TRIANGLE FRATERNITY
1375 Presidents’ Cir, Salt Lake City, UT 84112
Tickets and information

MONDAY SEPTEMBER 16
KANSAS CITY, MO
7:00 PM | UNITY TEMPLE ON THE PLAZA presented by RAINY DAY BOOKS
707 W 47th St, Kansas City, MO 64112
Tickets and information

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 17
CINCINNATI, OH
7:00 PM | JOSEPH-BETH BOOKSELLERS
2692 Madison Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45208
Tickets and information

WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 18
LOUISVILLE, KY
7:00 PM | LOUISVILLE FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY presented by CARMICHAEL’S BOOKSTORE
301 York Street, Louisville, KY 40203
RSVP/more information

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 19
RALEIGH, NC
7:00 PM | HUNT LIBRARY @ NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY presented by QUAILRIDGE BOOKS
1070 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC 27606
Tickets and information

How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems

I’m excited to announce that I have a new book coming out! It’s titled How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems, and it’s an extremely unhelpful guide to solving everyday problems.

how-to-blog

How To is an instruction manual for taking everyday problems and using science and creative thinking to turn them into much bigger and more exciting problems. It teaches you how to cross a river by boiling it, outlines some of the many uses for lava around the home, and walks you through how to use experimental military research to ensure that your friends will never again ask you to help them move. 

From changing a lightbulb to throwing a pool party, it describes unusual ways to accomplish common tasks, and analyzes what would happen to you if you tried them. In addition to being a profoundly unhelpful self-help book, it’s an exercise in applying math, science, and research to ordinary problems, and a tour through some of the strange and fun science underlying the world around us.

How To will be released on September 3rd, but you can preorder it now from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, Indie Bound, and Apple Books.

For more, you can check out my Q&A with Entertainment Weekly about the book, and you can find details about foreign editions at xkcd.com/how-to.

A puzzle for the UK

Sadly, my current Thing Explainer book tour doesn’t stop in the UK (although you can come see me at London’s Royal Institution via live videolink on December 7th—tickets here).

However, in lieu of an in-person visit, my publisher and I have put together a special puzzle for UK readers to solve.

The puzzle has two steps. Step one is to find out where step two is.

For step one, you can pick any one of five cities. Here’s a helpful map, followed by some interesting facts about each city.

uk-map-80.png

Bristol: 2.72km
A major port, built on seven very steep hills, Bristol has long been home to explorers and inventors – and the UK’s oldest dinosaur. In 1497 John Cabot sailed out of Bristol to try to find a better route to Asia and discovered Newfoundland instead. Isambard Kingdom Brunel designed this tall road in 1830. It took another 34 years to finish, and he lived only to see the towers built (one in the suburb the road is named after).

London: 0.44km
A city famous (in song) for its bridges falling down and (in stories) for its streets not being paved with gold.  A fifth of all the pieces everything is made of were discovered in London, including hydrogen (originally called ‘inflammable air’) in Clapham, and ten by Humphrey Davy here. There’s even a red world space car in the Science Museum.

Oxford: 0.51km
Inaccurately described by writers as ‘a city of dreaming spires’, Oxford is obsessed with thing explaining. Oxford professors CS Lewis, Tolkien and Lewis Carroll turned Christianity, Anglo Saxon and mathematics into successful works of fiction. This college lays claim to William of Ockham who came up with the principle of Ockham’s razor, that the most straightforward answer is usually the right one. They would all agree that the writing stick is mightier than the sword.

Edinburgh: 1.85km
Built on an extinct volcano, this city is famous for its body snatchers, for Peter Higgs (big tiny thing hitter) and for Dolly the sheep. Alexander Graham Bell was educated here, and missed it so much when he moved across the Atlantic that he invented the telephone, precursor to the hand computer.

Cambridge: 0.05km
The university was founded in 1209 by students on the run from the Oxford police. Home to Isaac Newton, famous for working out colours of light and for understanding how dangerous sitting under an apple tree could be; a descendant of that tree remains near his room.  Also home to Stephen Hawking and 89 Nobel prizewinners (31 more than Oxford), and the Mathematical bridge.

Good luck!

Prizes will include signed copies of Thing Explainer and limited-edition posters and mobiles. There will also be one very special first prize.

Those who’ve solved the clue but are unable to get there in person should get in touch at thingexplainer@johnmurrays.co.uk. For updates on the results see @johnmurrays. The results and winners will be announced on www.johnmurraybeagle.co.uk on 7th December 2015.

A Thing Explainer word checker

Want to try writing using only simple words? Here’s a writing checker you can use: xkcd.com/simplewriter.

To help me write the words in my Up Goer Five picture, I taught my computer to watch my writing and tell me when one of the words I used wasn’t in the top ten hundred. After I put up my Up Goer picture, other people made things to check writing, too (like this one).

When I decided to write Thing Explainer, I went back to the writing checker I had used and made it better. Now, I’m happy to be able to share it with everyone!

To use it, just touch here and start writing. If you use a word that’s not in Thing Explainer’s set of the ten hundred, the word will turn red. (I usually count all forms of a word, like “kick” and “kicked,” together as one word, although there are a few special cases where I don’t.)

Have fun explaining things!

A note on the words: Some words are used more often in certain kinds of writing and talking than in others, which means different ways of counting words will give different answers for which ones we use the most. The set of ten hundred words in Thing Explainer comes from putting together many ways of counting how much people use a word to come up with a single set of ten hundred words that should sound familiar and simple to lots of people. 

Thank you to James Zetlen, who helped make the word checker work on other people’s computers and not just mine.

I’m going on a book trip!

I made a book that explains things. It’s called Thing Explainer. It will be out soon! It’s a big flat book full of pictures of things with lots of parts. There are also little words that tell you what all the parts do. You can read more about it here!

When my book comes out in two months, I’m going to visit a lot of places with it! I’m going to New York, Seattle and Portland, San Francisco and Berkeley, Houston, Chicago and Naperville, and Toronto. If you live near one of those cities, maybe you can come see me!

In each city I visit, I’ll be standing in a big room and talking to people. I’ll also be writing my name in people’s books, but only if they want me to.

blag_words

Here’s how you can come see me in each city. (This part doesn’t use simple words, but that’s because I like the people whose buildings I’m visiting and don’t want to make problems by using different words from the ones on their signs and stuff.)

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24
NEW YORK, NY
BARNES & NOBLE UNION SQUARE | 6:00pm
33 E 17th Street
Note: A limited number of wristbands and seats will be available to those who provide proof of purchase of Thing Explainer from a Barnes & Noble retail location or BN.COM. For details, click here.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30
SEATTLE, WA
TOWN HALL SEATTLE AT THE GREAT HALL | 7:30pm
In Conversation with Hank Green
1119 8th Avenue
Tickets: $5 includes admission. Seating is limited. A portion of proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to Zeno: Math Powered. To purchase tickets and for details, click here.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1
BEAVERTON, OR
POWELL’S BOOKS AT CEDAR HILLS CROSSING | 5:00pm
3415 SW Cedar Hills Boulevard
Note: Book signing only. Purchase of Thing Explainer from Powell’s is required for admission. Space is limited. For details, click here.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2
SAN FRANCISCO, CA
THE BOOKSMITH AT THE RICKSHAW STOP | 7:00pm
155 Fell Street
Tickets: $35 includes one book and admission. Seating is limited. To purchase tickets and for details, click here.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3
BERKELEY, CA
BERKELEY ARTS & LETTERS | 7:00pm
First Congregational Church
2345 Channing Way
Tickets: $35 includes one book and admission. Seating is limited. To purchase tickets and for details, click here.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 7
HOUSTON, TX
SPACE CENTER HOUSTON | 11:00am
1601 NASA Parkway
Tickets: Free with the price of admission to Space Center Houston. Seating is limited to those who RSVP here. To purchase tickets and for more information about Space Center Houston, click here.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9
NAPERVILLE, IL
NAPERVILLE READS | 7:00pm
North Central College at Pfeiffer Hall
310 E Benton Avenue
Tickets: Free, but required for admission. Seating is limited. To get tickets and details from Anderson’s Bookshop, click here.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10
CHICAGO, IL
ILLINOIS SCIENCE COUNCIL AT 1871 | 6:00pm
222 W Merchandise Mart Plaza
Tickets: $43 includes one book and admission. Seating is limited. To purchase tickets and for details, click here.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11
TORONTO, ON
INDIGO BOOKS & MUSIC AT THE ISABEL BADER THEATER | 6:30pm
In Conversation with Ryan North
93 Charles Street W
Tickets: $40 includes one book and admission. Seating is limited. To purchase tickets and for details, click here.

Other places

Can’t make any of these events, but still want a signed copy? A limited quantity of signed Thing Explainers are available to pre-order from Harvard Bookstore, Porter Square Books, and Brookline Booksmith.

Already pre-ordered your copy? Email your proof of pre-order for the print edition of Thing Explainer—either a copy of your e-receipt or photo of print receipt—and mailing address to trademarketing@hmhco.com by November 15, 2015 and you’ll be entered to win one of 300 signed bookplates, which look like this:

TE bookplate

Winners will be chosen at random. Winners will be notified and bookplates will ship the week of November 23, 2015. (U.S. participants only—sorry!)

New book: Thing Explainer

A while ago, I posted the comic Up Goer Five, an annotated blueprint of the Saturn V rocket with all the parts described using only the thousand most common English words.

Today, I’m excited to announce that I’m publishing a collection of large-format (9″x13″) Up Goer Five-style blueprints. The book is full of detailed diagrams of interesting objects, along with explanations of what all the parts are and how they work.

The titles, labels, and descriptions are all written using only the thousand most common English words. Since this book explains things, I’ve called it Thing Explainer.

cover-web

The diagrams in Thing Explainer cover all kinds of neat stuff—including computer buildings (datacenters), the flat rocks we live on (tectonic plates), the stuff you use to steer a plane (airliner cockpit controls), and the little bags of water you’re made of (cells).

Thing Explainer will be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on November 24th. You can preorder it now (AmazonBarnes & Noble, Indie Bound, Hudson); click here for links to more information and options.

Or, in the spirit of the book:

I had a good time drawing Up Goer Five, so I decided to draw more pictures like that and make a book of them. The book explains things, so it’s called Thing Explainer.

You can’t have Thing Explainer yet, but if you want, you can order it now, and you’ll get it about a month before the end of the year.

Touch these blue words to learn how to get Thing Explainer.