Trebuchets, Geohashes, and Richmond, VA

A while back, I was home in Virginia for a little while, and my friend James decided it was time to build a trebuchet

Pictured: James, Doug

I say measure once, cut eighty or ninety times.

As you can see by Doug’s hat, trebuchets are very serious business.

I had to leave before we could test it, but they finished up the last touches in my absence. This week, we got a chance to fire it for the first time.

The projectile (three full Dr Pepper cans taped together) vanished off into the woods. Firing successful! In the video, you can see falling leaves cut by the projectile.

In other news, Geohashing is working out wonderfully. At the most recent meetup I attended, we flew a camera from a kite and then tried to spell words under it.

There’s a new feature in the map-locating program where you can suggest and vote on alternate meetup sites for a given day. So far, the pattern is generally that we show up at the location, then find a nearby park or restaurant to hang out at. Bringing games and activities is encouraged.

I wasn’t able to make it to the most recent meetup because I was at MoCCA. By the way — thank you to Chris Hastings of Dr. McNinja for his generous hospitality. He gave me a place to sleep with no advance warning and didn’t even get mad when I spent the night sick on his couch, beat him at Mario Kart, and stole half his stuff. (If anyone wants a good deal on some of his erotic Batman fan art, let me know.)

This afternoon (starting 4:00-ish), some friends and I are heading to Belle Island in Richmond, VA, which is an alternate location for today’s geohash. I hear there are fireworks or something?

151 thoughts on “Trebuchets, Geohashes, and Richmond, VA

  1. xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references. Although known for its crudely drawn cast of oddball stick figures,[7][2] the comic occasionally features landscapes, intricate mathematical patterns such as fractals (for example, strip #17 “What If” shows an Apollonian gasket[8]), or imitations of the style of other cartoonists (as during “parody week”). Occasionally, realism is featured.[9][10]

    The comic is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License.[11] New comics are added three times a week, every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday,[3] at midnight EST[12] although so far they have been updated every weekday on three occasions: parody week, the five-part ‘Choices’ series and the 1337 series.xkcd is a webcomic created by Randall Munroe,[1][2] a former contractor for NASA.[3] It calls itself “a webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language.”[4][5] The site states there is no particular meaning to the name,[5] that it is simply a “treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.”[6]

    The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips ar

  2. Ladies and gentlemen, may I present you with a disturbing piece of information.

    Please direct your attention to the first picture accompanying this blog post.

    Now, please direct your attention to this image. http://www.nuklearpower.com/comics/080626.png

    The being depicted in the second image is referred to as a “Bad haircut demon”. I think we might need to be very afraid.

  3. Just wanted to say that that’s pretty awesome, and give mad props to my boy JAMES (the dude in that blag post) who I happen to work with. Does that make me an internet superstar by default?

  4. I didnt read the whole thread, but i am in awe of this “Doug”‘s resemblance to Jason of Foxtrot o.O

  5. did they just take this thing to massachusetts?A friend of mine took a pic of one attached to a uhaul. The trailer had Virginia plates.

  6. Ummm… The Geohash thing keeps sending me into the ocean and when I find a date that keeps me dry I have other things planned. Is it a conspiracy? Are you all just virtual puppets sent to lure me on to a raft in the north sea?

  7. Pingback: blag, kites and flying « georg in paris

  8. O__O

    That trebuchet is almost exactly like the one we converted our Science Olympiad catapult for Trajectory in the B division to after competition.

  9. Trebuchets! I have a friend who is obsessed with them… He currently has 3, all of them larger than a person, and the two smaller ones he has, he has a great deal of fun with them.

    So here’s the scenario. My dad does Black Powder Shotgunning, clay targets, and he goes to a club every month. Following me? Good. You’ll see what this has to do with the previous comment soon, though I can imagine you have a vague Idea where I’m going with this. So one day my dad decides. ‘Hmm. I think I might ask him to bring his Trebuchets out…’ So he does. He also brings bags of flour weighted for the treb. Queue about a dozen or more shotgunners lined up to the side of the firing trajectory. Take aim. Fire the bag of flour…
    I swear, it was one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. The repeated this procedure until it got dark, when the treb guy swapped to oil-soaked rags enclosed in chicken-wire, which equated to hurling fireballs accross the field. Altogether a wonderful day.
    Excuse my rant, I thought you and the fellow xkcd-ians would find that immensly amusing.

  10. Nice construction. Do you plan a war or something like that? It is nice when working together when meeting and reach a great success.

  11. ummm who creates this stuff …. i love it i would love to meet the person who creates the comics!!!! <3

  12. I’m getting rather obsessed with recycling these days… I hope you picked up the litter you created, at least :P Still, good job.

    Hmm, the reCAPTCHA said “cosmic loans”, harhar. Apparently they’re becoming almost pointless now anyway as AI advances — although I did see a bizarre 3D scene based “What’s the letter associated with the person’s left arm?” concept that made me laugh. Quite clever though, as it involved a scene comprising different objects like humans and flowers (of all things to use as an example…), moveable joints, and randomly picked arrangements. It would still be a visual approach only though, unless it came with audio description.

  13. WTF is Joe Shabadoo about, taking up an inordinate amount of comment space with what appears to be almost an entire wiki article on XKCD?! Or is this, along with that rather amusingly stupid “PISSCOCK” nonsense, part of a bizarre new form of spam?

  14. I am quite sure Doug’s hair is the cure for cancer.

    It has to be…

    It is just so goddamn magnificent. I am left modest in its grandeur…I am crushed beneath the overwhelming power it emits.

    I can only assume that you have to fend women off of this Doug fellow because his hair is 90 million times more powerful than any propaganda situation proposed by the folks behind 3 letter deodorant commercials (Let it be known if your deodorant is a single syllable it smells like ass … which I believe is also a single syllable…so it’s appropriate).

    Regardless to my little tangent…if there is a god he/she spent all their time working on that wondrous mane.

    Goddamn I’m jealous…

    PS. 1889, Nickerson was my reCAPTCHA …I don’t know why but it sounds somewhat like an erotic novel for old pre-civil war era American Settlers.

  15. Just learning about Trebuchets the first time, since I’m a big comic fan its quite strange that I did not find this earlier. Thanks for sharing

  16. The repeated this procedure until it got dark, when the treb guy swapped to oil-soaked rags enclosed in chicken-wire, which equated to hurling fireballs accross the field

  17. The subjects of the comics themselves vary. Some are statements on life and love (some love strips are simply art with poetry), and some are mathematical or scientific in-jokes. Some strips feature simple humor or pop-culture references.

  18. Los temas de los propios cómics varían. Algunos son declaraciones sobre la vida y el amor (unas tiras de amor son simplemente el arte de la poesía), y algunos son matemática o científica en los chistes. Algunas bandas cuentan con referencias humor o la cultura pop simples.

  19. Usted está comparando los tamaños de almacenamiento sin mencionar que Nintendo va a permitir a los usuarios conectarse HDs externa de hasta 3 terabytes en el sistema a través de los puertos USB.

  20. So I was disappointed that I was taking so many pills with little effect. thank amazon a lot, you give me a chance to give my parents more health. The first time I used NRT, specifically NicoDerm. I ordered this product and changed my mind the very same day, called to cancel and refused to do so, said they had to go through the process and ship it out and charge me. I’m not able to use this every night because it does cause some irritation/itching, but when I do use it it does work well. After taking it for few days, I no longer feel as tired as before, it really works!! I also recommended it to my friends too! Give it a try, it’s great! We tried everything! They last our baby 10-12 hours for his night sleep. I get twitches in my eyes sometimes and some of the meds I’m on make my vision blurry at times. Will not interfere with your decor if anything, it may improve it. I wish there were more hooks in between for a more customized fit.

  21. One of the modern methods to increase community awareness of the Internet. Nowadays, the Internet has been a very good position in this field achieved.
    I’m up for being in a particular field, your information will go to the Internet. Because this method is very simple and reliable. Glad that the visitor field increases conversancy There are sites that.

  22. An she was such a beauty until the bolt holding the weight broke :( RIP Dillymonger, you’ll be resurrected one day. poker

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>